Organic regenerative almonds of La Junquera

2.00 kg/box

Organic regenerative almonds of La Junquera

2.00 kg/box

Buy directly from the farmer. Without intermediaries.
Limited & seasonal harvest.
The farmer does (yet) not ship to:  United States
Specifications
Contents of the box: 1 box contains 2kg of organic regenerative almonds
Variety: Guara, avijor and antoñeta
Guara: a more rounded and light brown almond, very sweet
Avijor: Uniform grain with an elongated shape, light amber colour and pleasantly sweet flavour
Antoñetta: Uniform rounded grain, light colour and intense sweet flavour
You'll receive a mixture of these three varieties
Organic farming certified by the European Organic Farming label since 2009 and regenerative organic farming since 2015
You can eat them as soon as you open the bag, whether raw as a snack, or toasted or fried, or in a yoghurt, or in delicious desserts such as almond and cinnamon fritters.
You'll receive them in cloth bags that you can wash and use again to store anything you need
Always keep them in a cool and dry place protected from direct sunlight, ideally in a glass jar with an airtight seal. In this case, they'll keep for up to twelve months
Harvest date: September - October 2022
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Environmentalist
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Cultivation in sparsely populated areas
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Harvest analysis
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Plastic-free
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Organic
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Renewable energy
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Young Farmer
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Family Farm
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Visitors welcome
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Additional analyses
Alfonso Chico de Guzmán
My name is Alfonso Chico de Guzman and I'm the fifth generation of farmers at La Junquera, an 1,100-hectare estate in Murcia that has belonged to my family for two hundred years. When I finished studying Business Administration in the United States and came back to Spain, my father pointed out the amount of fertile land that was being lost on the family farm. However, back at that time, nobody really knew what to do as everything was being farmed conventionally. Even so, I was convinced that there was a solution and that the land that had once been so overworked could once again produce something more than just pebbles. So, I decided to get going and explore the world of regenerative farming in search of a solution to recover the land. We initially grew cereals until we realised that monoculture wasn't giving us the expected results, so we decided to diversify the crops. However, it's hard for many old crops to survive in the climate conditions of La Junquera, where it sometimes rains so much that millions of litres cascade down a ravine but aren't retained in the soil. That's why our everyday work is focused on improving the soil and biodiversity on the farm. We dig infiltration trenches, apply our own compost to the soil and create ponds, which have hugely contributed to biodiversity and even attract otters to our land. We also set out to regenerate the village of La Junquera, which has laid derelict for fifty years. People have gradually got to hear about our project, with some of them so attracted to it that they've stayed here to help us or set up their own businesses. As for me, apart from this adventure of regenerating La Junquera, I launched the most important project of my life: creating my family here. All kinds of people pass through La Junquera now, but one of the reasons why I'd love to showcase my project to all the CrowdFarmers is that we can get to know each other, bring regenerative farming to their homes, teach them about it, and introduce them to the wonderful flavour of our almonds.
La Junquera
Have you ever felt that you can change something? That's how I felt when I listened to my father talk about the amount of fertile land being lost on the family farm, and hearing that they couldn't figure out how to fix it. I felt I had to do something to retrieve the land that had belonged to my family for two hundred years, since my great-great-grandfather bought it. Since then, La Junquera has been passed down from generation to generation, being used to grow cereals in a conventional way. That was until it was my turn, as the fifth generation, I decided to shift towards regenerative agriculture, looking for a solution to recover land that was so badly affected. The farm is called La Junquera because of the spring below it, the source of the River Quípar, which was named Fuentejunquera after the reeds in the area. It covers 1,100 hectares and is located in the Altiplano Murciano/Granadino area of Murcia, at 1,100 metres above sea level and surrounded by mountains between 1,500 and 2,400 metres high. In addition to La Junquera, we also grow almond trees on two more plots of land located about thirty kilometres away, which are called La Vereda and Reverte. The intensive and conventional cultivation of cereals that had been taking place on the farm over the years was ultimately wearing away the soil. What's more, rainfall is scarce here all year round, and when it does rain, it's really heavy, and this is getting worse and worse due to climate change. These rains wash away the surface layers of the soil, where the plants find nutrients. These factors were the main causes of the poor fertility of the soil at La Junquera. The first step was to leave conventional agriculture behind and start with organic farming, which we did back in 2009. However, as we're located in a semidesert area, we realised that our land needed much more. We needed more techniques not just to stop polluting the land, but also to improve our soils, collect rainwater to feed our crops and enhance biodiversity, as year after year we were seeing that these factors were getting worse and worse. That's why in 2015 we started the transition to regenerative farming. In keeping with this agricultural philosophy, we now only use rainwater on the farm, and we take advantage of every last drop. This involves using techniques that stop us from losing water in the ground, such as increasing the amount and quality of organic matter in the soil. We've also built trenches following the contour of the land and ponds to store rainwater. Not only does this help retain water on our farm, but it also helps refill aquifers, maintain nutrients in the soil and, therefore, increase biodiversity. Another technique we use to increase biodiversity on the farm is crop diversification. For example, we've planted almond trees, pistachio trees, vegetables, apple trees, vines and aromatic plants. In addition to planting crops, there are also strips of permanent vegetation between the rows of trees with legumes, spontaneous vegetation, shrubs and non-productive native trees replanted by us. All this helps us to increase the presence of natural enemies on our farm, along with the construction of drainage channels and ponds. La Junquera is also home to twenty-five Murciano-Levantina cows, a critically endangered species (with only thirty-five examples left in the world). To close the cycle, we incorporate the soft shell of the almond into the soil along with crushed pruning remains. As for the hard shell, we want to launch a project in 2023 to use it as fuel for distilling aromatic plants and heating the farm. We also nourish the soil with manure from the sheep that graze on the farm and that we ourselves compose in a vermicomposting project, also known as worm composting. What's more, we've installed solar panels that produce most of the electricity used on the farm. Thanks to all our hard work over the years, in 2020 we received a BBVA Award for Best Sustainable Producers. And not only do we have the agricultural project on the farm, but we also carry out education, entrepreneurship and research projects focused on the sustainability, regeneration and restoration of ecosystems. At La Junquera we want to go one step further and also regenerate the social side. The aim is to give opportunities back to people in rural areas through land regeneration and restoration. Up to 1969, there was a tiny village within the estate where approximately 120 people lived. It then became derelict, until I decided to move here ten years ago. When I arrived in 2012, there were only two people working in the area. But little by little, and alongside other people that have arrived, we've managed to form a regenerative village: a group of fifteen people who now reside in La Junquera and work on regeneration-based projects, such as an academy, a winery and an environmental volunteer camp to reforest natural areas. My wife Yanniek and I work together on the agricultural project along with eight other people, who have been with us for between two and ten years, and who receive a salary above the industry minimum. Seeing the environment of La Junquera gradually change every day thanks to our hard work and perseverance is the most rewarding part of my job. I can see how the farm and the village have changed and I love seeing what we've managed to do over the years. That's what gives me strength every day to continue focused on the regeneration of rural agri-food systems. Although there's still lots left to do at La Junquera, I'm really proud to be recovering the land that my family has managed generation after generation in order to make it productive in a sustainable and beneficial way for the soil, and also to regenerate the social side of the environment, without which this entire project wouldn't be possible.
Technical information
Address
La Junquera, Cehegin, ES
Altitude
800 - 1.500 m
Team
3 women and 7 men
Size
300 ha
Cultivation technique
regenerative and ecological
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