Organic honey from O'Picouto

3,40 kg/låda

Organic honey from O'Picouto

3,40 kg/låda

Köp direkt från odlaren. Utan mellanhänder.
Begränsad och säsongsskörd.
Farmarn skickar (ännu) inte till:  Förenta staterna
Specifikationer
Lådans innehåll: 1 låda innehåller 3.4kg organic honey
Art: Apis Mellifera Iberica
6 x Organic honey Ouro Mouro (570g, glass jars)
Bramble, chestnut and heather multi-flower honey: dark with reddish hues, sweet and intense flavour; this honey crystallises easily, taking on a lighter, cream-coloured shade
Oak honey: our bees don't produce this honey from the nectar of flowers, but from the honeydew secreted by the Pyrenean oak; it's jet black, less sweet than other honeys, and with a high content of mineral salts and iron
Our honey is packaged raw, so it hasn't been subjected to industrial overheating processes that lower the quality by destroying the enzymes and altering the honey's composition
Crystallisation is a natural process of honey, so don't worry if your honey crystallises: its texture will change slightly, but it's just as tasty; only non-heated honey crystallises, so it's an indicator of quality
To preserve your honey, keep it at room temperature, away from direct heat sources
The consumption of honey is not recommended for babies under 12 months
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Aroa García Morales
Hello everyone! My name's Aroa García and I'd like to briefly tell you about my motivation to engage in beekeeping in the small town where my grandparents used to live. My parents have been involved in organic farming for more than twenty years. In fact, they founded Labregos DAIQUÍ in 1996, a group that sets out to pursue activism and the fight for the environment by fostering organic farming in Galicia. You can find out more about this story by visiting the organic kiwi project that my father Manuel has with Casimiro: Finca Reitoral de Ribadetea. However, this didn't seem so attractive to me a few years ago and I decided to move to the city to study Graphic Design. I spent a few years working there at a marketing studio, enough to realise that the city wasn't my thing, so I went back to the village to help my parents. My father always had a few hives for family use, but the volume of work meant that he couldn't take care of the bees properly and he got rid of them. However, after my return from the city, we gradually resumed this family tradition with a huge amount of enthusiasm, slowly increasing the number of hives each year until I was able to dedicate all my time to beekeeping. This is the best way for me to earn a living without leaving my small village and in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way, while going back to the origins of our family. Bees are fascinating, and although physically it's very hard work, it's wonderful to observe them and learn a little more about them every day. Over time you can see the different 'personalities' of each of the hives (some are very friendly, others are very clean, and others are like warriors). I also love watching their dances when they tell the colony where there's a source of food. And I also work in the most wonderful office where I receive visits from roe deer, wild boar, hares, foxes and eagles, which always brightens up my day. My great-grandfather had beehives and my great-uncle was one of the first beekeepers in the area to have movable frame hives, as traditionally in Galicia the hive consisted of a hollow trunk known as a cortizo. He would sell his honey to the neighbours and it was seen as an authentic medicine. He was also the first in the area to have a honey extractor that he made himself with a wooden barrel and a bike chain. Ours are small apiaries, so they don't have much impact on the natural environment. They're spread across an area declared a biosphere reserve and in mountain regions that are difficult to access.
O'Picouto
On a day trip once up the slope of Mount Aguioncha, the highest in the area at almost 1,000 metres above sea level, we realised that it was the ideal place for bees. With hardly a second thought, we started talking to the villagers to see whether someone would let us put our hives on some of their land. Then we met Domingos, and after talking with him and his wife Lola, they told us that they'd be delighted for us to install our hives on the land they once used to grow potatoes on. This peak, known as O Picouto de Mediodía, is visible from everywhere in the surrounding region. In the past, people used it as a point of reference, as when the sun was at the top of the peak it was time to stop working and go home for lunch, hence its name and that of our apiary. The farm is located about twenty minutes from my village Rairiz de Vega (in Lobás, Calvos de Randín), in the heart of the Baixa Limia-Serra do Xurés Nature Park, away from the tiny settlement and further still from large towns. The plot structure in the area is based on the traditional Galician smallholding, made up of small farms that have been abandoned due to the rural exodus and an ageing population. This situation is dramatic but true, with the population density in Calvos de Randín being less than eight inhabitants per km2. We believe that organic beekeeping is the perfect way to earn a living in a rural environment in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way. Our bees live surrounded by vegetation in a wooded environment, with the coldest winters in the province (temperature can plunge to -13ºC). This forest is made up of oaks (*European oak* and *Pyrenean oak*), chestnut trees, brambles and all kinds of heath, elderberry, buckthorn, prickly broom, common broom and many other wildflowers that our bees enjoy. They live happily here and produce an exceptional honey. Our beekeeping is totally organic, sustainable and respectful to the bees. We work hard to treat varroa, a mite from Asia that causes a disease that kills entire hives if it's not treated at the optimal time. To do so, we use a compound based on natural substances that doesn't leave residues in the honey or on the wax. To understand our work and respect for bees, you need to realise that they persistently collect honey and pollen. They don't think about us and they work tirelessly to store enough food for the winter, a time when flowers and food sources are scarce. However, a hive has many more bees during the months of blossom than during the winter. This causes the bees to produce an excess of honey, which is exactly what we collect. We always leave plenty of honey for them, as our goal is not to feed the hives unless strictly necessary. To do this, we collect before the end of the flowering periods and always keep a surplus in case they're needed at the end of winter. In general, we don't interfere with the replacement of the queen in the hives, letting them decide the ideal moment themselves. And, of course, we don't clip their wings, because if their instinct leads them to swarm, we let them do so. As you may know, rainfall in Galicia is quite frequent, so on and around the farm there are small springs that flow down streams from which our bees drink, who in summer can consume around 500 millimetres per hive per day. For the past six years, my father Manuel and I have been taking part in this project. We usually go to the apiaries together and do the same jobs, but he has more strength and I have better sight, so we complement each other well. When the good weather kicks in, we check the hives to see whether the bees have had a good winter, we renew the wax and we reproduce the most advanced colonies that are about to swarm. This means that we get new colonies without limiting the natural instinct of the hive to swarm. During this period, the supers are also placed on the hives (supplementary boxes in which the honey is collected). In the summer, we collect and package the honey. Another important job is to keep the apiaries clean in order to prevent the vegetation from stopping bees from entering and leaving their homes, and to prevent possible fires. In the autumn and throughout the winter, I spend my time preparing and repairing the material for the following season. What's more, we visit the apiaries to check that storms or animals haven't damaged the hives. Our waste management is simple: we reuse all the wax resulting from the extraction of honey to produce new sheets. What's more, we're currently conducting some tests to make mead and propolis tincture.
Teknisk information
Adress
O'Picouto, A Carballal, ES
Altitud
1000m
Team
1 woman and 1 man
Odlingsteknik
Organic Farming
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