Vino blanco y rosado de Château de la grave

4,50 l/caja

Vino blanco y rosado de Château de la grave

4,50 l/caja

Compra directamente al productor. Sin intermediarios.
Cosecha limitada y de temporada.
El Farmer no envía (de momento) al país seleccionado:  Estados Unidos
Especificaciones
Contenido de la caja: 1 caja contiene 4.5l de vinos blanco & rosado, Château de la Grave, Colombard/CabernetAOP Côtes-de-Bourg
Variedad: Colombard ou Cabernet Sauvignon
3 x blanco Château de la Grave Grains Fins (botella de 0,75l): muy aromático, con notas mezcladas de cítricos, melocotón, nectarina y frutas exóticas. A veces, un toque de pomelo completa este delicioso y armónico frutado.
3 x rosado Hommage de la Grave (botella de 0,75 l): combina la complejidad aromática de un gran vino blanco, el largo final de un vino tinto y la delicadeza de un rosado. En nariz, detectamos sutiles e intensas notas de bayas con especias. En boca, el vino es a la vez corpulento y ligero, acompañando a la comida sin añadir pesadez ni amargor
Conversión a la agricultura ecológica desde 2020, certificado con el nivel 3 de Haute Valeur Environnementale (Alto Valor Medioambiental) desde 2017
Consumir preferentemente entre 8 y 10°C para disfrutar de todos los aromas y sabores del vino
Fermentación y crianza en barricas de roble francés y americano durante 7 meses. Embotellado a partir de marzo
Estos vinos se pueden consumir en primavera o también se pueden guardar muy bien durante varios años, ¡te sorprenderá!
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Lou Bassereau
My name is Lou Bassereau. I am a young winegrower. I grew up in the middle of the vineyards, at the heart of the farm's daily work. Here, family life and farm life are one! One of my fondest memories as a child is being allowed to join the adults tasting the grape juice at the very beginning of fermentation when it starts to sparkle, and there is no alcohol yet. There is an attachment, an anchor, that means that we do not even ask ourselves what to do when we grow up. As such, I studied viticulture and oenology in Bordeaux. I had also developed another passion for music through the bass guitar. I had the chance to train as a professional bass player for two years, but I missed being in contact with nature. So, I joined the family property in 2018, and I continue to play music for my own enjoyment. Each generation of the family has worked hard to improve the wines' quality so that today it has an assured and recognised value. It's a great family heritage that is not always easy to take on, but I know that I can count on my parents and on our loyal and dedicated team of 10 people in total, who support us under all circumstances. On an estate like ours, you have to know how to do everything and be everywhere at the same time: in the vineyard, in the cellar, in the office, with our French or international customers. I like to work in the vineyard, look after the animals, follow the seasons, take care of each vine and monitor the grapes' ripening until harvest time. To make good wine, you first need good grapes! My father, Philippe, still runs the estate. He is always passionate, full of ideas and proud to pass his expertise on to me. My mother, Valérie, is his right-hand woman; she is always upbeat and positive. She also takes care of our guest rooms at the castle, which is open from May to October. It is a unique place to discover and share the profession of winegrowing and our passion for wine in a world of calm with a change of scenery. My motivation for being part of CrowdFarming is to offer our wines to the people who will actually taste them. It guarantees that you are buying a product directly from the farm, without intermediaries, and gives you a direct link to the producer. I think the idea of adopting vines is innovative and very engaging for both parties.
Château de la Grave
The history of the Domaine de La Grave dates back to the fifteenth century. It was a small winegrowing hamlet that was initially composed of a mansion and various farm buildings, land, vines, meadows and woods until the nineteenth century. In 1868, it was renamed CHÂTEAU DE LA GRAVE when the main house was transformed into a charming castle with a tower, turrets and roof with slender, lively shapes that give it a unique neo-Gothic and neo-Renaissance look. My great-great-grandfather Constant Bassereau acquired the property in 1910. At that time, the estate already had ten hectares of vines and produced 120 barrels (tonneaux). In the Bordeaux region, a tonneau corresponds to four barrels (barriques) of 225 litres each, i.e., 900 litres. It is still used today as the unit of reference for the official listing of wines between producers and merchants. In 1912, Constant was called up as a soldier. Helped by other courageous wives of winegrowers, his wife took care of the estate until the end of the First World War. Their son, Robert, saw the arrival of the first tractors, which replaced oxen in the 1950s. Mechanisation... It was a revolution! This made it possible to expand the vineyard and produce more wine. The estate now has 45 ha of vines and produces the equivalent of 220 barrels. My grandfather, Pierre-Yves, raised our wine’s profile in France and abroad, especially in England and Belgium. In 1990, my father took over the property. As someone who isn't afraid to overturn the established order, he has created new, original and atypical cuvées and imagined original blends that we are continuing together to this day. We are located on the Gironde estuary's right bank, 35 km north of Bordeaux, in the heart of the Côtes de Bourg vineyard. Historians trace the wine-producing vocation of our region to around the second century, the period in which the Romans planted the first plot of "Vitis Biturica", the ancestor of Cabernet. In the Middle Ages, the village of Bourg-sur-Gironde was a vital wine port, and its estuary vineyards expanded in step with the rhythm of life and river trade. Our 45-ha vineyard grew during previous generations, but we have always kept woods and meadows. Today, we are once again keeping animals on our land, as in the past. In this way, I wish to create a new agricultural balance based on common sense by reconnecting with the ecological and human benefits of eco-grazing. Our horses and sheep are now helping us control grass cover among the vines from October to April, and we are recreating meadows - orchards in the vineyard. Producing wine is not just about the harvest period. It is a long-term job that begins as soon as the leaves fall in November with the vines' pruning. The wood falls to the ground, where it is crushed and incorporated into the earth. After pruning, the next step is binding: the branches that are still flexible are attached to the trellis wire to channel the plant's growth and promote the grape clusters' sound development. In April, the buds begin to open, and the first leaves form and develop. This period also marks the beginning of branch growth. Next come the spring-time jobs of suckering and lifting, which will end at the beginning of August when the twigs stop growing and become lignified to form bark and reserves for the following winter. Simultaneously, the bunches of grapes change colour; this is known as the veraison and marks the beginning of the fruits' ripening period. It takes about 45 days to reach an adequate level of ripeness, around mid-September. The date of the harvest will be decided according to the health and the ripeness of the grapes. It can vary by a few days from one year to the next, and the harvest is spread over three weeks. Harvesting has been done by machine since 2005. Our entire team (8 people in all) works in the cellar, receiving and sorting the grapes, filling the vats and barrels and cleaning the cellar and equipment at the end of the day. After the harvest, the pace is less intense, and the pressure of bringing in the crop subsides. Only three people remain to monitor the fermentation process and carry out all the racking and blending work. For white and rosé wines, the grapes are pressed upon arrival to the cellar and, once they've settled, the juices are put into barrels for fermentation. They will stay there for 6 to 7 months until bottling. We have always chosen to adopt agricultural practices that respect nature. We do not use any chemicals, chemical fertilisers or herbicides. Our work is based on preserving plant and animal biodiversity, which is so fragile and useful and of extraordinary richness. To this end, we maintain forests, thickets, hedges and fruit trees on the estate. In 2020, we committed to converting our vineyard to organic farming. This carefully considered approach will prolong our HVE3 certification and is now undoubtedly the path of the future for our terroirs. We take pride in better production practices and respecting natural balances.
Información técnica
Dirección
Château de la Grave, Bourg, FR
Altitud
80m
Equipo
5 hombres y 3 mujeres
Dimensión
45ha
Técnicas de cultivo
Agricultura en conversión a ecológica
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