avocados
Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján
Harvest available! order a box. You may also adopt once the season has ended.
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The project

Adopt an avocado tree from the farm "Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján" in Almuñecar (Spain) and receive your harvest in the form of avocados at home. The Farmer José Antonio will take care of your adoption and take its picture. Also, you will be able to download the adoption certificate and, if you wish, plan your visit to the farm. You do not enter into any long-term commitment: once you receive your harvest and you enjoyed the experience, you may decide to renew and extend the adoption.

The project

Adopt an avocado tree from the farm "Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján" in Almuñecar (Spain) and receive your harvest in the form of avocados at home. The Farmer José Antonio will take care of your adoption and take its picture. Also, you will be able to download the adoption certificate and, if you wish, plan your visit to the farm. You do not enter into any long-term commitment: once you receive your harvest and you enjoyed the experience, you may decide to renew and extend the adoption.

What do you adopt?
You adopt an avocado tree cultivated under the European Union's Organic Farming regulations. We are in the process of converting and hope to get certified in 2022. During the process of adoption you can choose a name which we will use to identify your avocado tree. On our finca, we have several varieties of avocados with different ages. Some were planted in the late 1980s and others in 2015. We've always been committed to environmentally friendly cultivation and we're in the process of obtaining the organic, which we hope to have by 2022. The avocado is a plant of Mexican origin that has been grown on the Granada coast for decades. We have four varieties of avocado on our finca, Fuerte, Bacon, Hass and Reed, this allows us to supply seasonal avocados from October to May each year. Depending on when you reserve your box, you'll receive one variety or another. The dates on which each variety is ready may vary depending on the weather. We'll let you know via social media if we change the varieties. The earliest varieties are the smooth-skinned Bacon (October-November) and Fuerte (November-December). We then start with the rough-skinned varieties such as Hass (December-April), which is the most popular avocado, and finally Reed (April-June), which is a round, rough-skinned variety. The oldest trees are up to four metres tall, some of them have been pruned to make them sprout stronger again. The youngest trees reach just about the size of a person. The size of the avocados may vary, both among varieties and within the same variety. The smallest variety is Hass. with a weight that starts at 150 g, while the largest is Reed, which can reach up to 600 g! The productive life of an avocado tree is around 100 years. For as long as you want to keep it and we can continue taking care of it, you can renew your adoption year after year. If your avocado tree dies, we will replace it with no additional cost and assuring the delivery of your harvest from others. A avocado tree from our farm produces an average of 28 kg each season. You do not have to commit to the consumption of the whole harvest. Each season you may decide what quantity to reserve and pay the maintenance in accordance with the amount you reserve. This way you will only pay for what you consume and we can plan and sell the remaining harvest amount to others.
What will you receive?
During harvest season you can progressively receive the quantity of harvest that you reserve on the moment of adoption. Shipping format: __4 kg of avocados__ * Bacon Avocado (October to late November): this variety has a more rounded shape and a dark green skin, which darkens a little bit more when ripe. The pulp has a creamy texture that makes it perfect for making guacamole, while it also has less fat than other varieties * Fuerte Avocado (early October to December): this variety has an elongated pear shape, with a green skin with small whitish spots when ripe that tends to go darker over time. It's appreciated for its higher oleic acid content and lower levels of fat * Hass Avocado (December to April): this is pear-shaped variety with a rough green skin that turns a very dark purple when ripe. It's the most popular type of avocado, thanks to its creamy texture and amazing flavour * Reed avocado (April to June): this variety large type of avocado has a round shape, with a rough, thick and leather-like dark green skin when ripe. Its flavour is very pleasant and its buttery texture is perfect for spreading and making guacamole * Farming in transition to organic farming since 2019 * Harvest on request, shipped without wax or preservative treatments in a cardboard box without plastics * One kilo contains between 4 and 6 fruits (the box contains 19 fruits approximately, depending on the size) * In one tree you have everything from small to large fruits, so your avocados will be heterogeneous * Keep them at room temperature until they are ripe, once they are fully ripe put them in the fridge to keep them longer * It is a climacteric fruit that will continue to ripen once you receive it On an organoleptic level, the smooth-skinned varieties are very similar. As they're earlier harvests, they have a lower amount of fat but are very tasty. The rough-skinned varieties differ in shape and size, have a higher fat content, a more intense flavour and a creamier texture. Although there are differences between avocado varieties, all are of excellent quality because they are harvested in their respective seasons. They are harvested only when they have reached their optimal fat content, and are not stored in chambers to speed up or slow down their ripening. Avocados will arrive at your door when they are still hard; to eat them, you must wait until they are ripe. Keep them at room temperature while they ripen; when they are ripe, you can put them in the refrigerator to make them last longer. The pace of ripening depends on the room temperature; avocados you received in October or May will ripen faster than those shipped in January or February because of this. If you want to speed up the ripening process, you can wrap the avocados in newspaper along with other fruit and store them in a slightly warmer place.
When will you receive it?
Please, check the deadline for participating in this project (deadline for adoption) below. As of this date shipments begin. You can plan all the deliveries once you completed the adoption process. The Farmer will collect your harvest on demand and just before shipment so you will receive it fresh, not treated with wax or other preservatives. We are able to extend our avocado season from October to June because we have four varieties. In early October, you'll receive smooth-skinned avocados (Bacon and Fuerte) followed by the rough-skinned varieties (Hass and Reed), which we will be sending out until the end of spring. All varieties start to be harvested when they have reached the necessary fat levels that define the avocado's characteristic creaminess. Bacon (October-November), Fuerte (October-December), Hass (December-April), Reed (April-June).
Why should you adopt?
* Learn who produces your food, how and where. Receive your food in a conscious manner. * Buy directly from the farmer. Help to generate wealth and better jobs in the rural areas. * Plan ahead and enable the Farmer to produce on demand. This way we can avoid overproduction and fight food waste. * Reward Farmers who make an effort to use environmentally-friendly packaging and cultivation techniques.
Plastic-free
Conversion to organic farming
Fresh and in season

How does it work?

Meet the Farmers

Meet the Farmers

Adopt and plan your harvest

Adopt and plan your harvest

Let the Farmer and nature work

Let the Farmer and nature work

Receive your harvest at home

Receive your harvest at home

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Environmentalist
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Conversion to organic farming
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Harvest analysis
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Plastic-free
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Young Farmer
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Family Farm
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Visitors welcome
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Additional analyses
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José Antonio Fajardo
My name's José Antonio Fajardo and I'm a young farmer and university student. Although I'm only twenty years old, I belong to a family of farmers and I'm the fifth generation, both on my father's and my mother's sides. My great-grandparents were from Otivar and Jete, two small towns on the Costa Tropical in Granada. This was where tropical fruits were first cultivated in continental Europe. As a homage, there's a delicious variety of cherimoya known as the Fino de Jete. If you don't know it, I recommend trying it if you can. It's not very common outside Spain, but is nicknamed the 'fruit yoghurt' thanks to its sweetness and creamy texture. My grandparents and great-grandparents used to grow vines, almond trees and olive trees on the dryland slopes and sugar cane on the valley floors, where there was more water. In the mid-twentieth century, following the decline of sugarcane cultivation in the region, they decided to start growing subtropical fruits. In the 1950s and 1960s, subtropical fruits were unknown in the region. My ancestors started to experiment with the cultivation of avocados and cherimoyas, becoming pioneers in the growth of subtropical crops, which are now quite commonplace in the region. The family still owns the original fincas and takes care of the trees they planted. We've been looking after them for seventy years now, with the same love that they put into planting them. Over time, we've acquired more fincas and now we grow a whole host of fruits, with the main ones being avocados, mangoes, cherimoyas and oranges, although we also have small plots with Orinoco bananas (a local variety) and guavas. As to be expected, my passion for agriculture comes from childhood, as it has always been the core focus of my maternal and paternal family. I'm fully aware of the importance of education to ensure the optimal management of fincas, which is why I'm currently studying Economics with a view to gaining knowledge for myself and conveying it to the family. On seeing my passion for the land, my parents asked me to manage this CrowdFarming project. The Altos de Cantarriján and Finca Valdivieso projects were created to be modern farms, where we can showcase our way of working and transfer this model of agriculture to other farmers. These farms were acquired by the family less than ten years ago. For two years now, I've been responsible for their management, always listening to the advice of a wonderful team made up by agronomists and employees, who are just like family as they've seen me grow up. And, of course, I'm lucky to count on the experience and love of my parents! My main goal is to refresh the approach that traditional agriculture has in the region. I'd like more young producers to see Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján and Finca Valdivieso as models of sustainable management. I'm convinced that organic farming, sustainable food production techniques, the circular economy of resources, the optimised use of water and new relationships with consumers will be the inspiration for the new generations of farmers. We need to change the production model. All these agricultural practices will mark a before and after in climate change, which concerns me so much on a personal level. I'm also convinced that in a few years' time the fincas that I manage will be better and that I'll have contributed to leaving a better world behind for future generations. CrowdFarming provides me with the opportunity to make this dream come true, as I believe in and share all the values that this platform offers to consumers across Europe. All my free time and holidays are spent on the farm. Time definitely flies by when I'm focused on working the land. When I can't be on the farm due to my studies, I call the foremen to ask how the harvest is going and help them with any jobs. Last but not least, I'd like to highlight my relationship with one of the people I admire the most: my grandfather. His name is also José Antonio Fajardo. He's the best reference I've ever had and has instilled in me an unconditional love for the land, for hard work and for things well done. I can't remember a single day in my childhood that I didn't want to spend with him going around farms, solving problems with the crops and watching the fruit grow. I've spent a lot of time with him, ever since my first steps as a toddler. Although I see him less now, I spend time with him whenever I can. He motivates me to fight for what I want and to do business well. In short, he's the perfect example of a lifestyle that I love and want to keep up.
José Antonio Fajardo

"Despite my youth, I've felt like a farmer ever since I took my first steps among our fruit trees. I love being a farmer at CrowdFarming and having a direct relationship with the end consumer. Sustainably producing fruit and sending it to consumers across Europe is our daily motivation to keep going with this project".

Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján
Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján
The Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján is a farm nestled in a valley near the Costa Tropical in the province of Granada, Spain. It's located in La Herradura (Granada), a pretty coastal village between the Mediterranean and the Sierra de Almijara, an area of sea and mountains, with plenty of slopes and ravines. Its name is due to the well-known Cantarriján beach, which receives the streams that form after rainfall. This practically unspoilt naturist beach is nestled among cliffs and is very popular in the summer with people keen to get off the beaten track. Agriculture is the most important economic sector in the region, ahead of tourism. This finca used to be somewhat neglected, as for many years it belonged to an investment company that had no relation to the agricultural industry. This company, unable to manage the farm as needed, met us and decided to sell it to us, as they fell in love with our project for it. When my family bought this land, we realised that we had to dedicate a lot of hard work to make progress, as much of the farm had been neglected for a long time. However, this was a truly motivating challenge! Part of the property was planted with avocados, but most of it was scrubland or covered by Mediterranean forest, which we still preserve today. Our goal was to create a family project with a future vision of sustainable agriculture. We love creating jobs in the region and leaving a positive impact on the environment and on society. We currently grow avocados and mangoes on this finca. We want to make sustainability our hallmark, as we love this region and want to protect it. We produce food with organic farming techniques, thereby improving the environment and creating wealth. More than ten permanent employees look after the finca throughout the year, a figure which doubles during the harvest period. Employees are paid according to the relevant collective agreement and some higher-level positions benefit from perks. The main restriction of the finca is the amount of water required. As is well known, tropical plants need to be watered frequently. We know the area and its climate very well, which is why from the outset we've made every effort to ensure that our main source of water for irrigation is rainwater. Due to the steep slopes and proximity to the sea, water is lost quickly when it rains. We decided to leverage this resource and collect rainwater that would otherwise be wasted. So, when it rains, we direct the water into a collection tank in the lower part of the finca. This water is then pumped into a tank at the top of the farm and then drip-irrigated, so not a single drop is wasted. Each avocado tree needs about 10 m3 a year and each mango tree about 2 m3, which varies depending on the age of the tree and time of year. At present, we're self-sufficient in water consumption solely with rainwater, although we have a well that we use as a reserve in emergency situations. The finca covers a large area and even though we grow avocados and mangoes, the largest part of the land is covered by pine groves and Mediterranean forest. We've installed beehives to help the pollination of crops and, in turn, local flora. And it's also common to see wild animals such as mountain goats, wild boars, birds of prey or chameleons. What's more, Hacienda de Altos de Cantarriján is currently processing the organic farming seal. Whenever possible, we avoid the production of waste. We manage all our plant waste, such as prunings and weeds, and turn them into compost on site. Grasses are removed manually, either by uprooting or mowing them. We make every effort to care for our trees so that very little fruit is discarded, although if it's very ripe and can't be sent to our customers, we send it to the local market or donate it to charitable organisations.
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Technical information
Address
Hacienda Altos de Cantarriján, Almuñecar, ES
Altitude
200m
Team
10 men
Size
100ha
Cultivation technique
Agriculture in conversion to organic
Irrigation
Drip irrigation
Location