cow cheese
Gaec Cambon
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The project

Adopt {publicVariety} of our flock "{farmName}" in {cityfarm} ({countryFarm} and receive your harvest in the form of {production} at home. The Farmer {farmerName} will take care of your adoption and take its picture. Also, you will be able to download the adoption certificate and, if you wish, plan your visit to the farm. As the production coming from one {variety} is big, the adoption is shared among various people. If you wish to have a bigger share, you may adopt more than once. You do not enter into any long-term commitment: once you receive your harvest and you enjoyed the experience, you may decide to renew and extend the adoption.

The project

Adopt {publicVariety} of our flock "{farmName}" in {cityfarm} ({countryFarm} and receive your harvest in the form of {production} at home. The Farmer {farmerName} will take care of your adoption and take its picture. Also, you will be able to download the adoption certificate and, if you wish, plan your visit to the farm. As the production coming from one {variety} is big, the adoption is shared among various people. If you wish to have a bigger share, you may adopt more than once. You do not enter into any long-term commitment: once you receive your harvest and you enjoyed the experience, you may decide to renew and extend the adoption.

What do you adopt?
Adopt {publicVariety} from our farm in {cityfarm} ({countryFarm}). The Salers cow is the emblematic cow breed of Cantal. It’s a rustic, ancient cow. She is very maternal: We can only milk her having her calf next to her, otherwise she won't give any milk. We are amongst the last farmers that are still keeping and milking the Salers cow, as its husbandry requires a lot of manpower. In fact, the calf has to stand right next to the mother during the milking because only the calf's presence will initiate the milk flow, and then we can attach the milking machine. The cow will decide how much milk she'll give us and keep the rest for her calf. This extraordinary cow feeds her cald and gives us milk to produce our cheese. The cow will be feeding her calf during 9 month, then her milk flow will dry up and she will rest for a new calf in the next year. A cow starts to give birth to calves and to lactate from 3 years on and can reach up to 15 years and more, as they are keeping them respecting their natural rhythm and with a healthy balanced diet (hay, concentrate, pasture). During most of the year the cows are outside and grazing on our roundabout 170 ha (from April to December). Our cows become up to 15 years, when she stops giving milk at an old age she will stay on the farm for fattening. The male calves are sold for exporting and the female are kept for replacement of our herd. We are very proud to keep alive the tradition of our Cantal. The cow has lyre shaped horns and mahogani-coloured coloured fur - mahogani translates in French to « acajou » and gives our cheese its name. We produce our cheese « L’Acajou » with a weight of 3.5 kg all along the year and leave it to mature on the farm. One cheese needs 30 litres of milk. All steps from milking all the way to the cheese ripening happens on our farm. The productive life of {publicVariety} is around 15 years. For as long as you want to keep it and we can continue taking care of it, you can renew your adoption year after year. If your {variety} dies, we will replace it with no additional cost and assuring the delivery of your harvest from others. Each {variety} is adopted by 100 CrowdFarmers who receive a box with {masterUnitsMax} kg of {production}.
What will you receive?
Each season we will send you a box with: 1/2 __"Acajou" cheese__ wrapped in paper (1.7kg) « L’acajou » is a pressed, uncooked cheese with a semi hard texture. Its full tastes reminds of milk and butter and will last long in the mouth. It’s possible to keep it in the fridge for preservation. Ambient temperature and being well aerated will however reveal its aromas much better!
When will you receive it?
Please, check the deadline for participating in this project (deadline for adoption) below. As of this date the Farmer will start preparing the orders that are to be shipped. You may select the delivery date of your box as suggested by the Farmer at check-out.
Why should you adopt?
* Learn who produces your food, how and where. Receive your food in a conscious manner. * Buy directly from the farmer. Help to generate wealth and better jobs in the rural areas. * Plan ahead and enable the Farmer to produce on demand. This way we can avoid overproduction and fight food waste. * Reward Farmers who make an effort to use environmentally-friendly packaging and cultivation techniques.
How does it work?
Meet the Farmers
Adopt and plan your harvest
Let the Farmer and nature work
Receive your harvest at home
Jean-Paul Cambon
We have been raising a herd of Salers for 5 generations because we are very passionate about this breed. It is a cow that we love very much, her qualities convince us so much that we can’t even imagine another breed. It is also the cow of our region, the Cantal. As our family has been here for generations, we wanted to perpetuate all these values from generation to generation. I've been immersed in the farm universe since I was a child. As a child, I was already in love with this Salers cow; I helped my parents with milking, I walked the cows barn’s alleys, mingling with the little calves ... One day, I decided to leave to learn the butcher's trade but after a few years, the farm called me back! This is how a normal day on the farm looks like: The day begins for me with the milking of the cows, the first essential step for cheese making, it's a big part of the work that I do together with my son Kévin. Milking is followed by animal care and feeding. Once we are finished with our Salers herd, there is always some outdoor work to be done. In the meantime, my wife makes the cheeses. The milk is pumped directly from the milking to our little cheese factory where Nathalie adds the rennet, so that the milk turns into curd. The curd is then stirred and placed in moulds lined with cloth. We then put the cheeses in the press until the evening when they will have to be turned over and stamped with a seal. Then they are put back in the press until the next day, when they will be removed from the moulds and kept in the cellar. This is where our son Kévin takes over, he really “pampers” the Mahogany; turning, washing the cheeses, rubbing; all sorts of indispensable care so that they age well in the cellar. Our day will end with a second milking together with my son. My wife’s day also includes serving some customers in our little farm cheese shop. We would like to join CrowFarming to expand our sales, spread the word about our cheese and promote our products ourselves.
Jean-Paul Cambon

"We are proud to be part of this project after having invented this new cheese, “Cajou”, from scratch, without the help of anyone. We are not a PDO. It is a cheese format that is not very well known in the region. We have registered the trademark "Acajou" and we would be so proud to see our cheese on sale all over Europe one day! In the future, we would like to sell our products also ourselves."

Gaec Cambon
Gaec Cambon
Our farm is called the Gaec CAMBON farm, we work as a family; Jean-Paul, Nathalie, our son Kevin and a full-time employee. The Cambon family has been on this farm for 5 generations. Our farm is located in Saint-Paul-des-Landes, in the Cantal, at an altitude of 600 m in the Auvergne Volcanoes National Park. The site of the farm is a former leper hospital dating back to the the 1300s. The large buildings on the farm have a very beautiful architecture with a configuration that is very typical for the buildings in the Cantal region. We cultivate only 6 hectares of wheat to have the necessary straw for the herd. The rainwater is sufficient for our crops, and we also have some streams crossing the farm. We practice a integrated agriculture: our grass is consumed by the pasturing cows, otherwise it is cut for hay with one or several cuts. We do not use fertilizers or pesticides and we are self-sufficient in terms of animal feeding.
Technical information
Address
Gaec Cambon, Saint Paul des Landes, FR
Location