Mixed box of Spanish specialties

4.57 kg/box

Mixed box of Spanish specialties

4.57 kg/box

Buy directly from the farmer. Without intermediaries.
Limited & seasonal harvest.
The farmer does (yet) not ship to:  United States
Specifications
Contents of the box: 1 box contains 4.57kg of products full of flavours from Spain
Variety: Olive oil Arbequina, Manchego cheese, Almonds Guara and Marta and multi-flower honey
1x Extra virgin olive oil (2.5l tin), 1 x Organic semi-cured cheese PDO (0.5kg, vacuum packed), 1 x Organic unpeeled raw almonds (1kg, compostable paper bag), 1 x Organic bramble, chestnut and heather multi-flower honey (0.57kg, jar)
Extra virgin olive oil: fresh olive oil from the last harvest; sweet, taste of green almonds, apple and green banana. It has been extracted by a cold spin process from the olive variety arbequina. Intensive green colour
Organic semi-cured cheese PDO: this young Manchego has a 3 month ageing period, which is when it gets its characteristic pleasant taste, with a grass-like aroma and a subtle spicy touch; it is important to keep them refrigerated and in their original packaging until consumption
Unpeeled raw almonds: sweet and mild flavour; brown peel; round and elongated shape; ideal for snacking anytime
Multi-floral honey of bramble, chestnut and heather: dark, with reddish reflections, sweet and intense flavour; this honey crystallises easily, acquiring a lighter shade
Box contains products cultivated by four farmers of CrowdFarming
The EVOO is made from olives grown on land that has not been treated with herbicides since 2010
The cheese is made from the milk of ewes that have been farmed under the Organic Farming rules since 2020 on the Soto de Marqués farm
The almonds have been grown on AlVeLal's land since 1999 under organic farming regulations
The O' Picouto beehives where the honey comes from have been certified under Organic Farming regulations since 2016
It is important to keep the cheese refrigerated in its original packaging until consumption
Best-before date for EVOO: 18 months from the date of production (November); best-before date for cheese: 1 year from production; best-before date for almonds: March 2024; best-before date for honey: September 2025
Store almonds in the refrigerator at 10ºC, in an airtight glass jar so that they will last up to 1 year without losing their characteristics; if they do not fit in the refrigerator, find a cool, dry place where they are out of direct sunlight
Honey and oil should be kept at room temperature away from heat sources
seal icon
Environmentalist
seal icon
Conversion to organic farming
seal icon
Product with history
seal icon
Organic
seal icon
Renewable energy
seal icon
Young Farmer
seal icon
Family Farm
seal icon
Visitors welcome
Gonzalo Úrculo
When I was 24 years old, a train crossed my path and I got on it without much thought. My grandparents' farm needed someone who dedicated body and soul because every year it went from bad to worse. I left my job in logistics, which had always been my passion, for some country boots and an old Barreiros tractor. I admit that I had never imagined myself as a farmer but after a few months, I was totally hooked. I believe that farming has that capacity that no other job has: it allows you to learn the basics very quickly so that you are useful but it will never allow you to master it. Together with my brother Gabriel, we started to cultivate the fields at the same time as we set up a website to sell our crops directly. In the first season, we had very few orders and most of our harvest had to be sold to intermediaries below our cost price. Year by year and thanks to word of mouth, our presidents (that's what we call our customers) were increasing. Over the years, we have started to grow new crops, among which olive trees stand out. The great culprit of my passion for the cultivation of olive trees is Miguel Abad. Besides being a great friend, Miguel is a recognized expert in the world of oil. After many lunches, visits to farms and olive oil mills, we finally found the opportunity that we both were looking for. In Campillo de Júlia we want to make our agronomic dream of creating a model farm in the cultivation and production of olive oil come true. We have many ideas to implement but we have to be patient and go little by little. We can't do everything at once. Some bigger projects are building our own oil mill and turning it into a self-sufficient farm in terms of energy and fertilizers.
Campillo de Julia
Júlia was the name of my maternal grandmother. A person who, although I enjoyed less time with her than I would have liked, had a huge influence on my life, on my passion for cuisine, and on my love of dining in good company. These wonderful memories prompted my brother and me to rename this olive farm Campillo de Júlia, formerly known as Masía del Campillo. On 24 January 2020, after some time looking for land to plant olive trees on, we took over an olive grove with more than five hundred years of history. Located in the town of Jérica (Castellón), it's a 116-hectare farm bordered to the south by the Regajo Reservoir and to the north by the Sierra de Espadán Nature Park. By talking to local people and researching some books, we're learning some fascinating facts about the history of this old farm. Back in the sixteenth century, the Campillo de Júlia housed a monastery of monks, after which it became an inn and then, at the end of last century, a livestock farm. One of the things that excited us the most is that the Camino de Santiago runs by the farm, on the route that starts out from Sagunto. We're currently renovating the stone farmhouse to turn it into a lodging for pilgrims or for CrowdFarmers with an adopted olive tree who want to come and visit us. We haven't stopped working since we bought the farm at the beginning of 2020 and it already looks quite different. In this short period of time, we have restored a shed for the 400 sheep that live on the farm to sleep in; we've built a compost heap where we can produce our own organic compost for the olive trees; and we've bought a tractor with its implements to prune the olive trees and spread the manure. On an economic level, we've managed to buy this olive grove after ten years producing, collecting and selling oranges. There have been good, bad and so-so years over the past decade. We were lucky that the worst years harvest-wise were the first few ones. That helped us learn how to do business with few resources, and that things could only get better. To make a living from agriculture, you have to develop the ability to save, especially when you have a good harvest and you tend to think that you're doing better than you are. When you look back, the bad years aren't so bad, and the good years aren't so good. The next big challenge for 2022 is the construction of the olive mill to produce our olive juice. This is the most complex step and the one that we've spent the most time thinking about. We're going to build an oil mill in one of the abandoned warehouses that we found in the olive grove when we bought it, and which was previously used for livestock. It won't be the largest oil mill in the world, or the one with the most modern machines, but we're going to try and make it more sustainable, thanks to the materials that we're going to use to build it, the source of energy (solar), and the second life that we're going to give to the waste it generates. The pomace to make compost and the stones to heat the facilities.
Technical information
Address
Campillo de Julia, Jérica, ES
Altitude
430m
Team
10 women and 12 men
Size
115 hectares
Cultivation technique
Organic agriculture (in conversion)
Irrigation
Drip irrigation
Frequently asked questions
What impact does my purchase have?
How is my order traveling?
What purchasing guarantee do I have?
What benefits do I get from buying directly from the farmer?
version: 0.73.0_20221201_170906