Jura wildflower honey from BioDemain

2.00 kg/box

Jura wildflower honey from BioDemain

2.00 kg/box

Buy directly from the farmer. Without intermediaries.
Limited & seasonal harvest.
The farmer does (yet) not ship to:  United States
Specifications
Contents of the box: 1 box contains 2kg of Jura wildflower honey
Race: Buckfast
4 x Jura Wildflower Honey (500 g each, glass jar)
Honey made from several varieties of flower and/or plant species from France; tinted with a beautiful yellow colour, with the characteristic of crystallising quickly; sweet and woody fragrance; a creamy, slightly fruity taste; each jar may vary slightly according to the species of flowers visited by the bees
Farming in conversion to Organic Farming since 2020
It can be eaten on toast, as an accompaniment to desserts or as a little extra in dishes; there are plenty of ways to enjoy our creamy honey!
Although it does not have an expiry date, it should be noted that from 3 years after the harvest, it will start to lose its taste and nutritional quality
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Environmentalist
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Conversion to organic farming
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Plastic-free
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Small Farm
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Visitors welcome
Vincent Pigourier
My name is Vincent, and I've been a beekeeper for 15 years. Originally from Ain, I settled in Doubs in 2010. I have been working with my partner, Gilles, for 13 years now, alongside us is Vaja, an apprentice who started working with us 5 years ago and who has now become our partner. From our harvests, we produce fir, acacia and wildflower honey. I studied engineering and worked in the oil industry previously. I asked myself a lot about the significance of my work and what I really wanted to do; I wanted a job with meaning. It was through meeting Gilles, my business partner, that I discovered beekeeping, and together in January 2016, we created Le Rucher du Comtois. I decided to follow this path because I have always been fascinated by bees: they are very intelligent animals that play an essential role in the proper functioning of biodiversity thanks to their ability to pollinate. It took me a long time to get into the business and it required a lot of investment. Indeed, learning all the right skills and techniques requires time and a significant financial investment. It's an exciting job because there are a lot of things to do. You don't just watch the bees work, contrary to what some people think. You must constantly maintain your apiary, check that the bees are healthy, even during the winter period. And during the honey harvest, the workload is increased tenfold. Depending on your equipment, this can be a very physical job. Uncapping, that is to say, removing the caps that close the cells of the honeycombs, and extracting the honey are laborious activities. There are only three of us on the farm, and in order not to fall into a routine, we regularly change our respective tasks, especially as organic beekeeping is very time-consuming. I used to work in the conventional sector, and then, after a long period of reflection and preparation of 3 to 4 years to switch to organic, I finally took the plunge. Reflection is a mandatory step, both before and during the transition. It is important to know how to deal with the changes resulting from this new production method. The conversion to organic farming is an adventure that has led us to discover a new way of looking at beekeeping. It also represents a big leap into the unknown! A great challenge to take on! CrowdFarming is a great opportunity for me to explain to consumers what the organic transition is, because it is a path full of pitfalls, but also let's me prove that a product undergoing the transition process has every right to be compared with its organic counterpart.
Le Rucher du Comtois - BioDemain
Le Rucher du Comtois: it is in the heart of the Jura mountains and embraced by the Doubs river that I decided to set up my 500 beehives, not far from Besançon, the farm has a 20 km perimeter. My apiary is located in France-Comté, hence its name, Le Comtois. My swarms of bees reach altitudes of 618m since Doubs is one of the highest French regions. Franche-Comté has forged its gastronomic identity through its landscapes and lands where farmers share and bring to life their ancestral expertise. Le Rucher du Comtois works mainly in the production of honey harvested on the various plateaus of the region in order to obtain a variety resulting only from our terroir. Our production is dependent on the work of our bees, which are subject to the vagaries of the weather. We must respect the bee and its development over the course of the seasons, and the resources present in the region. In 2020, I decided to turn to a sustainable production model in order to care for my health and that of my colleagues. By going organic, I am now able to avoid conventional chemical treatments requiring the use of overalls and masks. This commitment is the result of a long phase of reflection and preparation. Indeed, the transition to organic farming involves various changes. For example, in order to maintain my operations, I had to reduce the number of hives because organic beekeeping is time-consuming. So I went from 700 hives in conventional production to 500 organic hives. In addition, the production of organic honey requires more organisation. In particular, I must always be aware of the infection rate of the Varroa parasite, which, if it exceeds a certain threshold, can destroy the hives and wipe out the crops. While conventional treatments make it relatively easy to get rid of them, organic techniques are much more limited. Finally, I had to invest in honey stocks, which were collected during the good times without harming the colony. Although the bees are self-sufficient, you still have to be prepared for possible famines that would be fatal to them. In terms of resource management, a pond was created to collect rainwater and promote biodiversity. The hives are fixed, and therefore they no longer practise transhumance, which means that the swarms no longer move from one hive to another to follow the flowers as they bloom. When I was a conventional farmer, the bees foraged in rape fields that were not organic. Now that the apiary has been moved, the bees draw their nectar from a wide variety of flowers. The foraging areas are located far away from potential pollution zones and are surrounded by more than 50% organic fields or areas with a low environmental impact. These are constraints imposed by the specifications of organic farming. To rise to these challenges, I am supported by the Lille-based company PourDemain, which promotes our commitment as an organic beekeeper. This allows me and my two business partners, including Gilles, with whom I have worked for 13 years, to receive a remuneration that covers their expenses incurred as a result of organic farming. It's also an opportunity to explain to consumers what organic honey can be. Your support is essential because conversion is a difficult 3-year period, during which it is necessary to learn new production methods and to face technical and economic challenges. You can be a force for change and support me in this conversion by adopting a beehive!
Technical information
Address
Le Rucher du Comtois - BioDemain, Rurey, FR
Altitude
400m
Team
3 men
Flock size
500 hives
Cultivation technique
Agriculture in conversion to organic
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